The Poison Database

The Poison Database

Plant Toxicity and its action on the Body and Mind

So just to let my readers know, I will be creating a database of the poisons of the plant realm. The Poison Database will be a big undertaking so bear with me while I get all this stuff in order. This will not happen overnight there are literally thousands of toxic compounds to cover… But I will get the bulk of it out to you so you can learn about these devious ingredients within the dark world of the poison in plant life. This will be in alphabetical order as it gets created. Bear with me… This will be fun! I promise!

Atropine

One of the tropane alkaloids found in plants of the nightshade family such as Belladonna, Mandrake, Henbane, Datura, Brugmansia, etc. Atropine has a spot on the World Health Organization’s Model List of Essential Medicines; The most important medications needed in a basic health system. Atropine is an anticholinergic. This blocks the action of acetylcholine which is responsible for a spectrum of functions in the body like muscle coordination, secretion, and the brain’s functioning as asleep or awake. This would make one function in the dream state even while physically awake and experience dreams in the waking reality as hallucination and delirium.

medicinal use: Atropine is used as an antidote for insecticides as well as various types nerve gas poisonings like sarin, VX, and soman. Atropine is used by ophthalmologists as a mydriatic to dilate the pupils. It is used to treat bradycardia (slow heartbeat; less than 60 beats per minute). it is used in reducing secretions (saliva, sweat) and can treat the symptoms of diarrhea. It is used along with scopolamine and hyoscyamine to treat stomach ulcers and other intestinal disease.

Toxicity: Atropine poisoning can cause tachycardia (fast heartbeat), dry mouth, mydriasis (pupil dilation), blurred vision, photophobia (sensitivity to light), dizziness, loss of balance, extreme confusion, tactile hallucinations, and death.

Antidote: physostigmine and pilocarpine

Hyoscyamine

One of the tropane alkaloids found in plants of the nightshade family such as Belladonna, Mandrake, Henbane, Datura, Brugmansia, etc. As an anticholinergic, Hyoscyamine blocks the action of acetylcholine which is responsible for a spectrum of functions in the body like muscle coordination, secretion, and the brain’s functioning as asleep or awake. This would make one function in the dream state even while physically awake and experience dreams in the waking reality as hallucination and delirium.

Medicinal use: Treats various gastrointestinal diseases like peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, pancreatitis, colic and cystitis. It is also used to treat some heart problems, secretions, respiratory problems, some symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Hyoscyamine has also shown promise in neuropathic pain in combination with opiates.

Toxicity: Hyoscyamine poisoning can cause arrhythmia, flushing and faintness, dizziness, loss of balance, headache, nausea, vomiting, dry mouth, eye pain, blurred vision, extreme confusion, tactile hallucinations, sexual arousal, euphoria, short term memory loss, coma, and death.

Antidote: physostigmine and pilocarpine

Scopolamine

One of the tropane alkaloids found in plants of the nightshade family such as Belladonna, Mandrake, Henbane, Datura, Brugmansia, etc. As an anticholinergic, Scopolamine blocks the action of acetylcholine which is responsible for a spectrum of functions in the body like muscle coordination, secretion, and the brain’s functioning as asleep or awake. This would make one function in the dream state even while physically awake and experience dreams in the waking reality as hallucination and delirium. Aside from that the scopolamine is listed in the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines: The most important medications needed in a basic health system. Like Hyoscyamine and atropine, it can have quite the dark side. But then there are smaller dosages that can be extremely kind and healing. Perhaps this was part of the meaning of Kieri, She has a good side and a bad side. Treat her with respect!

Medicinal uses: Scopolamine enjoys a wide variety of medicinal use. Some of these are: Postoperative nausea and vomiting, motion sickness, gastrointestinal spasms, renal or biliary spasms, irritable bowel syndrome, Clozapine induced hyper-salivation (drooling). bowel colic, sometimes used as a premedication to surgery.

Toxicity: Scopolamine can induce tachycardia (fast heartbeat), bradycardia (slow heartbeat), arrhythmia, blurred vision, photophobia (sensitivity to light), dry mouth, mydriasis (dilated pupils), hives/rash, itching, constipation, urinary retention, agitation, restlessness, vivid hallucinations, confusion, dizziness, seizures, anaphylactic shock, shortness of breath, redness of the skin, drowsiness, and death.

Antidote: physostigmine

 

 

Deadly Nightshade Artwork by me - Poison Database
The fatal kiss of Belladonna and Datura